IP lockdown

David Weinberger has a very eloquent, pointed comment on the most recent academic plagiarism scandal. I love the disclaimer at the end.

One comment, however: When you use the term “intellectual property,” you’ve already lost the argument. That term, by likening copyrights and patents to real property, gives them an implicit permanence, concreteness, and totality that they’ve never had, until now, either in the Constitution or in subsequent legal history.… Read the rest

IP lockdown

Sitting bulls and rung jumpers

New workplace terminology, from “outplacement firm” Challenger, Gray, and Christmas:

Righteous CEO (Chief Ethics Officer): Executive selected to review corporate operations and practices to ensure that ethical standards are being met.

Sitting Bull: Retirement-age worker who, due to stock market and other savings losses, will not leave, thus blocking younger workers from advancing.… Read the rest

Sitting bulls and rung jumpers

Information science: values

INFORMATION SCIENCE: THE INVISIBLE SUBSTRATE, by Marcia J. Bates, UCLA

From the abstract: “The mental activities of the professional practice of the field are seen to center around representation and organization of information rather than knowing information. It is argued that such representation engages fundamentally different talents and skills from those required in other professions and intellectual disciplines.… Read the rest

Information science: values

Google news flaws

Nick Denton has a smart critique of Google News: “It discriminates against an exclusive, which is perverse. A story exclusive to one source — the New York Times scoop on US war plans, for instance — will rank low. While a standard calendar-driven wire service story — reported everywhere, without any great enthusiasm — scores highly.”

This gets to the nub of Google’s power, and also its biggest shortcoming.… Read the rest

Google news flaws