Roger Ebert, 1942-2013

“I believe that if, at the end of it all, according to our abilities, we have done something to make others a little happier, that is about the best we can do. To make others less happy is a crime. To make ourselves unhappy is where all crime starts. We must try to contribute joy to the world. That is true no matter what our problems, our health, our circumstances. We must try. I didn’t always know this, and am happy I lived long enough to find it out.”

– Roger Ebert

via Susan Barnett

Ebert obituary from the Chicago Sun Times

Ebert’s last tweet

Roger Ebert, 1942-2013

A faith of verbs.

This is my living faith, an active faith, a faith of verbs: to question, explore, experiment, experience, walk, run, dance, play, eat, love, learn, dare, taste, touch, smell, listen, argue, speak, write, read, draw, provoke, emote, scream, sin, repent, cry, kneel, pray, bow, rise, stand, look, laugh, cajole, create, confront, confound, walk back, walk forward, circle, hide, and seek. To seek: to embrace the questions, be wary of answers.

Terry Tempest Williams, via A Word a Day

A faith of verbs.

News is something someone wants to suppress.

“News is something someone wants to suppress. Everything else is advertising.” —Lord Northcliffe

By that measure, there are mighty few true news reporters in tech publishing right now. Declan McCullough, certainly; Kim Zetter‘s coverage of e-voting machines also qualifies. Who else is uncovering news from the tech world that somebody wants to suppress?

(Quote taken from a biography I’m currently reading: All Governments Lie: The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. Stone, by Myra MacPherson. An alternate version of the quote: “News is what somebody somewhere wants to suppress; all the rest is advertising. “)

News is something someone wants to suppress.

When man invented the bicycle…

“When man invented the bicycle, he reached the peak of his attainments. Here was a machine of precision and balance for the convenience of man. And (unlike subsequent inventions for man’s convenience) the more he used it, the fitter his body became. Here, for once, was a product of man’s brain that was entirely beneficial to those who used it, and of no harm or irritation to others. Progress should have stopped when man invented the bicycle.”

– Elizabeth West, Hovel in the Hills (via SFBC)

When man invented the bicycle…