Tag Archives: apple

Wake me up when the iPhone 42 comes out

iPhone concept in colors

Here we go again. The clouds part, and another iPhone descends from the heavens.

What mystical secrets will be written on the device’s extra-large, 640-by-1,136-pixel Retina display? Will there be earthshaking new features? Will it contain the answer to the question of life, the universe, and everything?

Not likely. Apple has entered a new phase in the evolution of its iPhone line, and you can pretty much forget about radical reinventions from now on.

The iPhone is now a mature product, and as with many mature products, the chief innovations will interest chief financial officers more than tech reporters like me: Expanding to new international markets and new carriers. Reducing dependence on sometimes-antagonistic partners like Google and Samsung. Marginal improvements to major features. Enough new features to maintain parity with chief competitors. And a few nifty extras, like rainbow colors (my favorite speculative iPhone 5 concept), to keep customers feeling special.

At this point, Apple has settled into its favorite spot: A comfortable No. 2. That’s because the company has always prioritized profits over market share and is happy to cede the latter as long as it can hang on to the former.

Read the whole story on VentureBeat: Wake me up when the iPhone 42 comes out

Dylan’s Desk: You are all to blame for Apple’s factories

Chinese factory worker

As everyone knows by now, iPhones and iPads are built in huge Chinese manufacturing plants where tens of thousands of people work 12-hour shifts for little money, have little privacy, and are exposed to toxic chemicals and unsafe conditions every day. We’ve been hearing similar stories across other industries for years, but this one’s on us — the tech community.

That’s right — all of us. It’s not just Apple. Motorola (whose acquisition by Google got a green light this week) and Nokia are doing it. Toshiba, HP, Dell, and Sony all use factories the New York Times reports as “bleak.”

It’s virtually guaranteed that behind every gadget stands an army of underpaid workers and polluting factories.

Read the full story: Dylan’s Desk: You are all to blame for Apple’s factories | VentureBeat.

Dylan’s Desk: Siri is the grandmother of Marvin the Paranoid Android

Marvin the Paranoid AndroidIn Star Trek IV, Scotty picks up a computer mouse and speaks into it, trying to get the machine’s attention. “Computer! Computer!” When nothing happens, someone tells him to use the keyboard. “How quaint,” is his bemused response.

You might feel the same way in 10 years, if someone hands you a computer without a voice interface. That’s because we’re on the verge of an explosion in interactive, interpretive computer voice control.

“The technology is just beginning,” said Norman Winarsky, the head of the venture arm of SRI, a legendary Silicon Valley think tank. “This is real artificial intelligence and real technology.”

Winarsky was talking to me about Siri, the voice-commanded assistant built into the iPhone 4S and the most impressive part of Apple’s product introduction on October 4.

Read the whole column: Dylan’s Desk: Siri is the grandmother of Marvin the Paranoid Android | VentureBeat.

Steve Jobs made a dent in the universe

Steve Jobs, the cofounder and former chief executive of Apple, has died. He was 56.

Jobs was a visionary leader who, more than any other single person, reshaped the face of consumer technology.

He was often quoted as saying “we’re here to put a dent in the universe.” He did exactly that.

From his earliest computers, co-developed with Steve Wozniak, to the smartphones and tablets that his company developed, Jobs showed a singleminded dedication to building products that were easier to use, better-looking and more intuitively useful than what had gone before.

He liked to say that Apple’s products were “magical,” and if that’s the case, he was the marketing and technology magician behind the curtain.

And if they weren’t exactly magic, Apple’s products were certainly a sufficiently advanced technology.

Read the story: Steve Jobs made a dent in the universe | VentureBeat.

It’s not the iPhone 5, but the iPhone 4S looks pretty amazing

Apple iPhone 4S in blackApple fans who expected an iPhone 5 today were disappointed.

Instead, all Apple unveiled was a phone that’s 2 times faster, with 7 times faster graphics rendering. It’s got a battery that’s good for a full day of talking, almost, and more than 3 solid days of listening to music. The camera is substantially improved, with a faster, f2.4 lens and an 8 megapixel sensor, and it records 1080p HD video. It’s a worldphone, meaning it will work on just about any cellular network around the world, both CDMA and GSM.

Oh, and you can talk to your phone, and it will answer your questions, thanks to a new feature called Siri.

Full story: It’s not the iPhone 5, but the iPhone 4S looks pretty amazing | VentureBeat.

More great coverage of the iPhone 4S launch from VentureBeat: